A Guide to Different Types of Two-Factor Authentication In today’s society, where the world wide web is such a major part of day-to-day life for so many people, personal security is crucial. One of the most common things companies do to secure their users’ personal information on the web is utilize a two-factor authentication process. You have likely used two-factor authentication, or 2FA, quite frequently, without even knowing what it was. 2FA requires a person to put his or her login information in over two different steps for the system to ascertain that he or she is who he or she is claiming to be. The most prevalent example of two-factor authentication happens at a bank ATM, no matter where you happen to be. When you put your debit card into the machine, it functions, so to speak, as your login information. After that step, you must enter your PIN number to prove that you are actually the person to whom the card belongs. 2FA is engineered to make sure identity thieves and other sorts of criminals are unable to do anything to seriously harm you before they are stopped. The remainder of this guide will teach you about some forms of two-factor authentication you’ve likely seen on the web at some point in time, or are sure to see in the future. Some Companies Use One-Time SMS Passwords
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In certain situations, you’ll type in your username and password, then be asked to let the company’s server text message you a one-time use password. This provides the system with proof that you have access to the phone number that is on file for you; a thief, in almost one-hundred percent of situations, wouldn’t be able to do this. The sole downside to one-time use SMS passwords is that individuals who just have landlines are unable to utilize them.
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Login Verification Is an Excellent Choice If you have ever been in the process of registering for a website and been asked to put in information like the name of your dog or the street you lived on during your childhood, you likely already know what login verification is, even if you weren’t aware of it until just now. Login verification involves entering another piece of personal information that only you would know after you’ve put in your username and password. It’s only problem is that a thief could, theoretically, have found out the piece of personal information somehow, though it is unlikely. If you operate any kind of website, you must learn as much as you can about two-factor authentication so you can use the right type to help your users feel as secure as possible when they log onto your system. If you work with a webmaster, ask him or her to help you make your site as secure as possible.